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EU to Publish Details of Probes of Tax Deals Benefiting Apple, Fiat

Posted on September 28th, 2014 at 20:13 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

European Union regulators will publish as soon as Monday their preliminary view that tax deals granted to Apple Inc. and Fiat SpA violated EU law, people familiar with the matter said, marking the next formal step in the bloc’s drive against alleged tax avoidance by multinationals.

The European Commission, the EU’s central antitrust authority, opened formal investigations in June into whether tax deals granted to Apple in Ireland, Fiat Finance and Trade in Luxembourg and Starbucks Corp. in the Netherlands amounted to illegal state support for the companies.

The commission will publish its so-called opening decision in the Apple case as soon as Monday, explaining why it reached the preliminary view that two tax deals agreed between the U.S. company and the Irish government—in 1991 and 2007—amounted to illegal state aid, a person familiar with the matter said.

Apple will have 30 days to respond to the EU’s decision, the person said.

Wait what, aren’t we just supposed to have congressional hearings and then do nothing?


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Comments:

  1. The taxman cometh.

Assassin’s Kittens Unity

Posted on September 28th, 2014 at 16:58 by John Sinteur in category: awesome


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Kicking the Facebook Habit

Posted on September 28th, 2014 at 14:36 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

In July, I posted 159 times to my 2,308 friends, or about five posts a day (peaking at 12), and got a total of 1,110 “likes,” or about seven per post (peaking at 228). Sometimes I commented on or liked my own posts, a pathetic kind of Freudian Möbius strip. There were two days in July when I didn’t post at all, but that chastity was undone by sharing videos posted by Diddy and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, a Barack Obama Throwback Thursday photo, and a status update by the astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson.

I was an old lady working the social-media slot machine. And my own likes felt perfunctory, never more so than my compulsion to like all the birthday notices posted on my page. Loading Facebook began to feel a lot like opening my inbox: lots of flotsam and jetsam.

It ended like any relationship does: bit by bit, then all at once. I wanted out from under Facebook’s thumb. So in mid-August, I deactivated my profile. (This can be undone at any time, unlike permanently deleting an account, a step that gives users 14 days to change their minds, and that I’m hesitant, for now, to take.)

When my friends tried to check in on me, they saw only an Error 404-style page. A typical note from an over-30 friend was “Are you O.K.?” A typical under-30 note was “Did you block me on Facebook?” Their self-centered hysteria only amplified my abstinence.

From the 12 Steps of FBAA FaceBook Addicts Anonymous:

1. We admitted we were powerless over Facebook—that our lives had become unmanageable.


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Fellate Show

Posted on September 28th, 2014 at 9:38 by John Sinteur in category: Pastafarian News


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