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Police often provoke protest violence, UC researchers find

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 23:31 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

The violence that turns a small-town protest into a fiery national spectacle like the one that has played out this month in Missouri is often unwittingly provoked by police, according to researchers at UC Berkeley.

The research team, which studied clashes between police and activists during the Occupy movement three years ago, found that protests tend to turn violent when officers use aggressive tactics, such as approaching demonstrators in riot gear or lining up in military-like formations.

Recent events in Ferguson, Mo., are a good example, the study’s lead researcher said. For nearly two weeks, activists angered by a white police officer’s fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager have ratcheted up their protests when confronted by heavily armed police forces.

“Everything starts to turn bad when you see a police officer come out of an SUV and he’s carrying an AR-15,” said Nick Adams, a sociologist and fellow at UC Berkeley’s Institute for Data Science who leads the Deciding Force Project. “It just upsets the crowd.”


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  1. The word I disagree with is “unwittingly”.

My… baker? Mom? Dominatrix?

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 23:25 by John Sinteur in category: News

4gyO590

I think she misunderstood the phrase ‘rollin in dough’.


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The Body in the Street

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 22:37 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

Bodies are not left in the streets of the leafy suburbs. The bodies of dogs and cats, or squirrels and raccoons, let alone the bodies of children, are not left in the streets of the leafy suburbs. No bodies are left in the streets of the financial districts. Freeze to death on a bench in the financial districts and you are whisked away before your inconvenient body can disturb the folks in line at the Starbucks across the street. But the body of a boy can be left in the street for four hours in a place like Ferguson, Missouri, and who knows whether it was because people wanted to make a point, or because nobody gave a damn whether he was there or not. Ferguson, Missouri was a place where they left a body in the street. For four hours. And the rage rose, and the backlash built, and the cameras arrived, and so did the cops, and the thing became something beyond what it was in the first place. And, in a very real way, in the streets of Ferguson, the body was still in the street.


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Vatican refuses to hand over files on accused pedophile priests

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 17:53 by John Sinteur in category: Pastafarian News

[Quote]:

The Vatican has refused to hand over the files of Australian priests accused of sex crimes to the child abuse royal commission.

The Vatican said the commission’s request for documents on each allegation involving an Australian cleric was “neither possible nor appropriate”.

Reasons included ongoing church investigations, and that internal working documents were the sovereign property of the Holy See.

Cardinal George Pell, now working in Rome, was asked if he sought an assurance from the Vatican that any document the royal commission needed would be provided.

“That is correct,” Cardinal Pell told the commission via video-link on Thursday.

“I suppose in retrospect there would be some discussion over what ‘any document’ meant.”


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  1. No-one is expecting the Spanish Inquisition.

Employers Can Legally Lie to Workers, Court Rules

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 16:22 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

In 2002 E.I. du Pont de Nemours announced plans to turn some of its operations into a separate subsidiary. Most of the affected employees were under a union agreement that gave them the right to transfer within DuPont if they preferred, a decision which would have cost the company an enormous amount of money to retrain the transfers and hire their replacements.

The employees were worried that if DuPont sold the new subsidiary it would hurt both their pay and retirement funds. To convince them to work in the subsidiary instead of transferring within the company, DuPont assured its employees that it had absolutely no plans to sell the spin-off. Based on this promise almost everyone moved to the subsidiary, which a few weeks later DuPont sold to Koch Industries. Koch cut both salaries and retirement packages. DuPont had, as it turns out, been negotiating this deal the entire time.

The Texas Supreme Court sees no problem with any of this.


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Rick Perry: It’s possible ISIS has crossed southern border

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 16:18 by John Sinteur in category: batshitinsane

[Quote]:

It’s a “very real possibility” that individuals with the extremist group ISIS may have crossed into the United States at the southern border, Texas Gov. Rick Perry said Thursday, though he added he doesn’t have any evidence.

Because the border is insecure, Perry said that “individuals from ISIS or other terrorist states could be” taking advantage of the situation. “I think it’s a very real possibility that they may have already used that,” he told an audience at the Heritage Foundation in Washington.

“We have no clear evidence of that,” he continued.

There’s a very real possibility that Glenn Beck raped and murdered a young girl in 1990. We have no clear evidence that Glenn Beck raped and murdered a young girl in 1990, but its a very real possibility.


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  1. There’s a real possibility that Gov. Rick Perry has committed a felony by misusing his office and authority. We have no clear evidence that he did. Oh, sorry, but we do! Doh! Now, where is that mugshot?

RTFM 0day in iOS apps: G+, Gmail, FB Messenger, etc.

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 15:35 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Apple’s documentation on the tel scheme is really short and easy to read. While reading the first paragraph something caught my attention:

When a user taps a telephone link in a webpage, iOS displays an alert asking if the user really wants to dial the phone number and initiates dialing if the user accepts. When a user opens a URL with the tel scheme in a native app, iOS does not display an alert and initiates dialing without further prompting the user.

So if I click the link in Safari I get the prompt asking me to confirm my action, if I click the link in a native app’s webView it doesn’t ask and performs the action right away (makes the call).

Do people read documentation?

No. And it’s bad.

I instantly assumed people do read documentation so there was no way a big player like Facebook, Twitter, Google, LinkedIn, etc. would do such a silly mistake… but I was wrong.


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  1. Nice!

What the jihadists who bought “Islam for Dummies” on Amazon tell us about radicalisation

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 13:51 by John Sinteur in category: batshitinsane

[Quote]:

Can you guess which books the wannabe jihadists Yusuf Sarwar and Mohammed Ahmed ordered online from Amazon before they set out from Birmingham to fight in Syria last May? A copy of Milestones by the Egyptian Islamist Sayyid Qutb? No. How about Messages to the World: the Statements of Osama Bin Laden? Guess again. Wait, The Anarchist Cookbook, right? Wrong.

Sarwar and Ahmed, both of whom pleaded guilty to terrorism offences last month, purchased Islam for Dummies and The Koran for Dummies. You could not ask for better evidence to bolster the argument that the 1,400-year-old Islamic faith has little to do with the modern jihadist movement. The swivel-eyed young men who take sadistic pleasure in bombings and beheadings may try to justify their violence with recourse to religious rhetoric – think the killers of Lee Rigby screaming “Allahu Akbar” at their trial; think of Islamic State beheading the photojournalist James Foley as part of its “holy war” – but religious fervour isn’t what motivates most of them.

In 2008, a classified briefing note on radicalisation, prepared by MI5’s behavioural science unit, was leaked to the Guardian. It revealed that, “far from being religious zealots, a large number of those involved in terrorism do not practise their faith regularly. Many lack religious literacy and could . . . be regarded as religious novices.” The analysts concluded that “a well-established religious identity actually protects against violent radicalisation”, the newspaper said.


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  1. We all know that most Muslims are just innocent lambs caught in an evil world controlled by the Great Satan.
    But now we have proof that all of the Islamic Jihadists are really just English football hooligans on holiday.
    So naturally we can blame all of the death and violence in the Muslim world on the English (and by extension the US and the rest of Dar al-Harb.)

  2. In retrospect, I’d say the Crusades _were_ a bit of a mistake.