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The Evidence Is In: Patent Trolls Do Hurt Innovation

Posted on July 26th, 2014 at 13:55 by Sueyourdeveloper in category: News

Quote from here

There were six times as many patent lawsuits last year than in the 1980s. The number of firms sued by patent trolls grew nine-fold over the last decade; now a majority of patent lawsuits are filed by trolls…

The economic burden of today’s patent lawsuits is, in fact, historically unprecedented. Research shows that patent trolls cost defendant firms $29 billion per year in direct out-of-pocket costs; in aggregate, patent litigation destroys over $60 billion in firm wealth each year. While mean damages in a patent lawsuit ran around $50,000 (in today’s dollars) at the time the telegraph, mean damages today run about $21 million. Even taking into account the much larger size of the economy today, the economic impact of patent litigation today is an order of magnitude larger than it was in the age of the telegraph.

Where’s the pesticide?


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Deuteronomy 22:28-29

Posted on July 26th, 2014 at 8:46 by John Sinteur in category: Pastafarian News


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Comments:

  1. Can no-one go back in time and eliminate that flea-bitten camel shagger, Abraham?

  2. Short answer no.

    If someone could (even in the future) he would already be gone.

    Also, he is probably not a real historical person, just a literary creation used to justify the take over of Canaan by the Israelites.

    He is the father of the Jews and the Arabs, so getting ride of him would eliminate a lot of people alive today.

    I am not aware if Deuteronomy 22:28-29 is ever implemented by Jews or Christians, but we know Muslims do this:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/05/world/africa/05somalia.html?_r=0

    seems a bit harsh, but what do I know, I am not any of the above.

  3. Clearly you know nothing about time travel either. What’s wrong with getting rid of a lot of people who would be unborn at the time? Every time you step on an insect you eliminate potential multitudes – not to mention Onan.

  4. Assuming that Time Travel ever becomes possible and widespread, I posit that the effect will be similar to Wikipedia – some areas will be hotly contested until a stronger authority steps in to maintain stability (“Time Cops”), but other areas will reach their own meta-stability because no one cares.

    Of course, the question is who will watch the watchmen.

    I read a delightful short story a while ago which was part of a collection based around individual elements (H, He, Li, Be, etc.). The Hydrogen story protagonist was a Timecop who had the rare ability to remember alternate realities, and was essentially a time terrorist because his bosses couldn’t remember what he’d changed.

  5. [Quote]:

    If we know one thing about time travel from watching cable, it’s that given the opportunity, someone will always travel back in time change things, whether to prevent World War II, or start World War III, or save Lois Lane from an unpleasant death. Whenever this takes place, we end up with a different timeline, presumably one in which someone different decides to kill someone’s parents before they’re born or whatnot, which creates yet another timeline, which is wiped out by someone else’s temporal shenanigans, and so on like a four-dimensional Escher painting.

    How many times does this take place? It’s impossible to say. As each timeline is created it’s instantly replaced, and you can’t get a thing done without finding out that your brother is suddenly your aunt, and rather than being a VCR repairman you’re Squindar, Lord of the Under-realm. It is for measurements such as these that the word “bazillion” was created.

    The only way reality can exist for more than an instant is when someone, by accident or design, changes things to create a universe where time travel is never discovered. And that, my friends, is where we are now. Time travel may be possible, but anyone who tries to discover it will fail, probably due to a misadventure of ludicrous improbability.