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Upstanding members of society…

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 22:53 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

Former Illinois State Rep. Keith Farnham was charged Monday with using both personal and state-owned computers to trade hundreds of images and videos depicting child pornography and engage in graphic online chats in which he allegedly bragged about sexually molesting a 6-year-old girl.

The federal criminal complaint alleged that Farnham, 66, a Democrat from Elgin, possessed two videos depicting child pornography on a computer that was seized from his state office in Elgin a week before his abrupt resignation in March.

[..]

When he resigned his seat on March 19, Farnham told the Tribune he was stepping down due to serious health concerns.

True, if you read that as mental health issues. He has a very sick mind.


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Diagnosis

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 22:47 by John Sinteur in category: Great Picture

gm3OQES


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Comments:

  1. The carburetor is flooded?

  2. It seems to be doing just swimmingly.

I hope they crash into a lime orchard…

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 21:37 by John Sinteur in category: Great Picture

sNNiOUu


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It’s Good – no – Great to be the CEO Running a Huge Criminal Bank

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 18:50 by John Sinteur in category: Robber Barons

[Quote]:

Every day brings multiple new scandals.  At least they used to be scandals.  Now they’re simply news items strained of ethical content by business journalists who see no evil, hear no evil, and speak not about evil.  The Wall Street Journal, our principal U.S. financial journal ran two such stories today.  The first story deals with tax evasion, and begins with this cheery (and tellingly inaccurate) headline: “U.S. Banks to Help Authorities With Tax Evasion Probe.”  Here’s an alternative headline, drawn from the facts of the article: “Senior Officers of Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley Aided and Abetted Tax Fraud by Wealthiest Americans, Failed to Make Required Criminal Referrals, and Demanded Immunity from Prosecution for Themselves and the Banks before Complying with the U.S. Subpoenas: U.S. Department of Justice Caves in to Banker’s Demands Continuing its Practice of Effectively Immunizing Fraud by Most Financial Elites.”

Oh, and the feckless DOJ (again) did not require any officer who committed the felony of aiding and abetting tax fraud to resign or to repay the bonuses he “earned” through his crimes.  But not to worry, the banks – not the bankers – may have to pay fines as the cost of doing their felonious business.  The feckless regulators did not even require Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley to disclose to shareholders their participation in the program.


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Comments:

  1. Couldn’t the DOJ just get an injunction to bar the executives from the banks while they investigate? Surely, no one in their right mind would leave the executives in charge while there’s an ongoing investigation. It would be too easy for them to destroy evidence. The executives are just employees, not owners, they have no rights in these investigations. The corporations has the rights guaranteed by the supremes (pronounce as “a-holes”), not the employees.

  2. @chas – I’m not saying they’re bent but there are suggestions of questionable practices by “the authorities” (admittedly the SEC not DOJ).

    http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/how-former-senior-sec-official-spender-c-barasch-manipulated-the-system-for-his-clients-benefit-and-his-own

Using Facebook Notes to DDoS any website

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 18:28 by John Sinteur in category: Security

[Quote]:

Facebook Notes allows users to include tags. Whenever a tag is used, Facebook crawls the image from the external server and caches it. Facebook will only cache the image once however using random get parameters the cache can be by-passed and the feature can be abused to cause a huge HTTP GET flood.


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How One Woman Hid Her Pregnancy From Big Data

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 18:20 by John Sinteur in category: If you're in marketing, kill yourself

[Quote]:

For the past nine months, Janet Vertesi, assistant professor of sociology at Princeton University, tried to hide from the Internet the fact that she’s pregnant — and it wasn’t easy.

Pregnant women are incredibly valuable to marketers. For example, if a woman decides between Huggies and Pampers diapers, that’s a valuable, long-term decision that establishes a consumption pattern. According to Vertesi, the average person’s marketing data is worth 10 cents; a pregnant woman’s data skyrockets to $1.50. And once targeted advertising finds a pregnant woman, it won’t let up.

[..]

Vertesi said that by dodging advertising and traditional forms of consumerism, her activity raised a lot of red flags. When her husband tried to buy $500 worth of Amazon gift cards with cash in order to get a stroller, a notice at the Rite Aid counter said the company had a legal obligation to report excessive transactions to the authorities.

“Those kinds of activities, when you take them in the aggregate … are exactly the kinds of things that tag you as likely engaging in criminal activity, as opposed to just having a baby,” she said.


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Comments:

  1. Walk into a store and buy a stroller. Won’t cost $500.

  2. Didn’t bother reading the article, but my impression is that gift cards are commonly used to pay for illegal/illicit stuff. Just like Tide. And in the U.S., “nobody” buys $500 worth of gift cards with cash. (i.e. it probably happens less frequently in a legit way than it does in a way related to crime.)

No woman, no cry?

Posted on April 30th, 2014 at 12:20 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

Jeffrey Mogil’s students suspected there was something fishy going on with their experiments. They were injecting an irritant into the feet of mice to test their pain response, but the rodents didn’t seem to feel anything. “We thought there was something wrong with the injection,” says Mogil, a neuroscientist at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. The real culprit was far more surprising: The mice that didn’t feel pain had been handled by male students. Mogil’s group discovered that this gender distinction alone was enough to throw off their whole experiment—and likely influences the work of other researchers as well.


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