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Evenly distribute the future: Issuing more bio-survival tickets

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 21:41 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

VC for the people – “It’s just that people who have options are much more likely to actually find success than people who don’t.”
also btw…

The Economic Case for a Universal Basic Income
Could We Afford a Universal Basic Income?
A Universal Basic Income: Conservative, Progressive, and Libertarian Perspectives


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Comments:

  1. I don’t know what to do with that barrage of links, but the “VC for the people” post is quite interesting. It’d be even more interesting if it had some models with numbers.

Java: Real or Not?

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 20:34 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

One of these classes is real. Two are made up.

Pick the one that’s not made up!


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2048 – Iron man mode

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 17:50 by John Sinteur in category: News

Stellar fusion in 2048 style


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Comments:

  1. This truly adds new elements to the game!

  2. It doesn’t seem to work on Linux/Firefox v24.4.0

Instructions unclear, I am now deaf in one eye

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 17:19 by John Sinteur in category: ¿ʞɔnɟ ǝɥʇ ʇɐɥʍ

X1EkUvV


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Comments:

  1. Nothing wrong, it is just the packaging. It is worn by turning the the muffs in alignment with each other. These are the same ones that are in use on the Roberts Court when they decide election law (one example). The bag is different, however. In the Supreme Court it says: “See No Evil Eyewear”.

New Study Outlines Water World Theory of Life’s Origins

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 16:06 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

A new study from researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, and the Icy Worlds team at NASA’s Astrobiology Institute, based at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CA, describes how electrical energy naturally produced at the sea floor might have given rise to life. While the scientists had already proposed this hypothesis — called “submarine alkaline hydrothermal emergence of life” — the new report assembles decades of field, laboratory and theoretical research into a grand, unified picture.


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OpenSSL Valhalla Rampage

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 15:25 by John Sinteur in category: Security

[Quote]:

Do not feed RSA private key information to the random subsystem as entropy. It might be fed to a pluggable random subsystem…. What were they thinking?!

Wow. The entire concept of it is so bad that if you can’t avoid it, it’s literally better to call exit() than go through with it.


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You don’t have to be a conspiracy theorist to find Google alarming

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 13:34 by Paul Jay in category: News, Privacy

[Quote]:

There is a quote from you in this context that concerns me. In 2009 you said: “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.” The essence of freedom is precisely the fact that I am not obliged to disclose everything that I am doing, that I have a right to confidentiality and, yes, even to secrets; that I am able to determine for myself what I wish to disclose about myself. The individual right to this is what makes a democracy. Only dictatorships want transparent citizens instead of a free press.

Against this background, it greatly concerns me that Google – which has just announced the acquisition of drone manufacturer Titan Aerospace – has been seen for some time as being behind a number of planned enormous ships and floating working environments that can cruise and operate in the open ocean. What is the reason for this development? You don’t have to be a conspiracy theorist to find this alarming.

Historically, monopolies have never survived in the long term. Either they have failed as a result of their complacency, which breeds its own success, or they have been weakened by competition – both unlikely scenarios in Google’s case. Or they have been restricted by political initiatives.

Another way would be voluntary self-restraint on the part of the winner. Is it really smart to wait until the first serious politician demands the breakup of Google? Or even worse – until the people refuse to follow?


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Vladimir Putin must be called to account on surveillance just like Obama

Posted on April 18th, 2014 at 8:44 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote]:

On Thursday, I questioned Russia’s involvement in mass surveillance on live television. I asked Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, a question that cannot credibly be answered in the negative by any leader who runs a modern, intrusive surveillance program: “Does [your country] intercept, analyse or store millions of individuals’ communications?”

I went on to challenge whether, even if such a mass surveillance program were effective and technically legal, it could ever be morally justified.

The question was intended to mirror the now infamous exchange in US Senate intelligence committee hearings between senator Ron Wyden and the director of national intelligence, James Clapper, about whether the NSA collected records on millions of Americans, and to invite either an important concession or a clear evasion. (See a side-by-side comparison of Wyden’s question and mine here.)

Clapper’s lie – to the Senate and to the public – was a major motivating force behind my decision to go public, and a historic example of the importance of official accountability.

In his response, Putin denied the first part of the question and dodged on the latter. There are serious inconsistencies in his denial – and we’ll get to them soon – but it was not the president’s suspiciously narrow answer that was criticised by many pundits. It was that I had chosen to ask a question at all.


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Comments:

  1. Kinda rich for Snowden to call anyone out for skipping out on accountability.